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    TJC Movies
  • America & World Jewry
  • Feature Films
  • History &
    Remembrance
  • Israel
  • TJC Original Series
  • Row J
  • The Salon
  • Up Close
  • Holy Dazed
  • Inside the Issues
  • Jews of Color
  • Modern Jewish Mom
  • The Portion
  • Rabbis Roundtable
  • Srugim
  • TJC Movie Talk
  • With the Editors
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  • Directed by: Peter Lilienthal Rating: TV-PG
    Release Date: 1979 Running Time: 120 mins.
    Language: German & English (subtitles) Genre: Drama
    More Info: New York Times review;Wikipedia Category: Feature Films


    Hitler’s war against the Jews was perhaps most savage in the way it targeted helpless, vulnerable children — young boys and girls whose only crime was being born to Jewish parents, and who were forced to pay with their lives. More than one million Jewish children perished during the Holocaust, of hunger, disease and brutal murder. But a small percentage of Europe’s Jewish children did survive — the result of courage, determination and sheer good luck. David pays homage to the children of the Holocaust in creating the story of an adolescent Jewish boy, David Singer, who comes of age in Nazi-occupied Berlin. David reveals the struggles for identity and survival that often overlapped among the Jews of war-torn Europe, particularly the young.

    “Father says we must be proud of being Jewish, especially now,” David tells his brother Leo, who tries to camouflage his Jewish identity by wearing a Nazi uniform. But the yellow star that David and his fellow Jews are forced to wear is not a mark of Jewish pride. When Jews’ essential identity became a death sentence in Nazi Germany, its value was called into question for so many Jews who endured the Holocaust.

    DAVID reveals the unfolding and progression of the war against the Jews in Germany, as seen from the limited perspective of one young boy. As he navigates through dangerous streets and railway cars, we observe with him the effects of Hitler’s policies on daily life in Berlin and on relations between Jews and non-Jews. Together with David, we witness the gradual but steady removal of the city’s Jews. In a subtle fashion, the film conveys the characters’ feelings of humiliation, betrayal and anger.

    The film opens in pre-War Germany, depicting the young protagonist’s experience of the rampant anti-Semitism that would soon grow into the Holocaust. In the first scene, young David is harassed by a group of German schoolchildren who beat him and taunt him with the words “Jew pig.” Later, a communal celebration of Purim — the Jewish holiday that commemorates the saving of the Jews of ancient Persia from extermination — foreshadows the impending war. David’s father, the congregation rabbi, delivers a sermon that describes the attempted annihilation of the Purim story, a grim portent of what is to come. But the scene is a case of dramatic irony: Rabbi Singer is not aware of, or does not want to acknowledge, the relevance of his own words to the situation in early Nazi Germany. When, in the middle of the celebration, a group of Germans march by the synagogue chanting “Jews get out, Jews get out,” he insists that they are in fact only calling out to the city’s youth, that their chant is actually: “Youth come out, youth come out.”

    The film is particularly compelling in its depiction of the intimate space of the Singer family and their interactions with one another — marked by love, devotion and the all-too-real fear of imminent loss and separation. When the rabbi is forced to watch his synagogue set aflame by the Nazis, and returns home with a swastika emblazoned on his head, he insists that the important thing is that the family is alive and together. But that won’t be the case for long.

    DAVID’s strength lies in its ability to capture and convey emotions that are never overwrought, and thus ring true. As he attempts to secure his own safety, David loses everything he has known—family, home and community. And with each subtle loss, the film reveals a new layer of strength, perseverance and determination in the young boy.

    The film brings its audience into the experiential world of its young protagonist, to see what he sees and feel what he feels, in order to gain a more intimate understanding of the personal trials and struggles endured by children of the Holocaust.





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